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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 64 (some duplicates have been removed)
, not as many as hoped for or expected. nbc's tom costello starts us off in our washington newsroom tonight with what all of this might mean. tom, good evening. >> hi, brian. the good news, anyone with retirement money invested in stocks has made back much of what they lost during the great recession and the wall street selloff, about $8 trillion. a big rally on wall street today, with the dow back over 14,000. a lot has changed since the last time it crossed that mark on october 12th, 2007. within a year, lehman brothers and bear stearns failed. housing prices went off a cliff. the unemployment rate went from 4.7% to 10% before falling back to 7.9% today. in portland, oregon this week, more than 900 people applied for 160 new jobs at two new hardware stores. >> 80% of the people we saw were -- had been out of work for three months to up to two years. >> reporter: julie ober has been out of work for 16 months. >> my last job was front desk at a pain management company. and just -- i actually got sick. and couldn't be there any longer. >> reporter: nationwide, some 12 million americans are s
. how much it costs us all. and what it's doing to our world. tom costello is with us tonight from one of the routinely worst spots in the nation, and, tom, what has happened in bethesda, maryland, behind you? it appears traffic is flowing. >> yeah, well, you know, murphy's law, right? 20 seconds ago i swear it was a little more congested. but the texas transportation institute says that in some cities in this country, you need to add an extra hour, hour and a half, two hours to a 30-minute drive just to get there on time. rush hour in l.a. >> we had a car that hit the guard rail. >> reporter: and veteran traffic reporter jennifer york is on the air. >> it's miserable. i mean, i don't think there's really any good day anymore to get to where you need to go. >> reporter: you name the city, you're bound to hear the same complaint. >> i wish i could get that time back. time is money. >> too many people driving, and not enough highway bandwidth. that's the reason. >> reporter: now, the list is out. the most congested city in america, washington. with commuters burning 67 hours and 32 gallo
tonight from nbc's tom costello. >> reporter: since 1934, american airlines has been a corporate icon. helping to build new york's laguardia airport, hiring the first female airline pilot, the first electronic tickets. ♪ something special in the air >> reporter: but after years of struggle, it surrendered to bankruptcy protection in late 2011. today, a lifeline in the form of an $11 billion merger with usairways. >> we will once again be an industry leader, worthy of the name american airlines. america's flag carrier. >> reporter: if approved, the deal would make american the world's largest airline. but after so many mergers in recent years, only four airlines, american, delta, united and southwest, would be left with 70% of the u.s. market. while airfares haven't risen much in recent years, experts warn, less competition could ultimately drive up prices. >> if you're looking out over the next three or four years of your vacation plans you'll average between 5 and 10% airfare increases year over year once you hit 2014. >> concerned about the overall number of flights available, the
unleaded has gone up for the past 32 days, 43 cents in a month. nbc's tom costello tells us what's behind this recent rise. >> reporter: at gas stations across the country, customers are asking same question, what could possibly send gas prices up 43 cents in a month. that's an extra $8.60 on a 20-gallon car. in chicago, it's more than that, up 70 cents a month to $4.22 a gallon. at this station, $4.29. for taxi driver ray hubert, that's real money. >> it digs into my pockets. i pay for my own gas. nobody else pays for it. >> reporter: in los angeles, up 50 cents a month to $4.28. some stations charging more than $5 a gallon. >> it doesn't make sense, we went to las vegas, gas prices were $1.50 ls. >> reporter: from coast to coast, gas prices have risen every day for the last month. >> the gasoline prices are extraordinary for this time of year. usually see this happen as we go into the summer driving season. >> reporter: what's going on? analysts say the reasons are many. china is demanding more oil every day to power its growing economy just as opec cut some of its output. international
of the attack in newtown, connecticut. our report tonight from nbc's tom costello. >> reporter: on capitol hill, it was raw and gut-wrenching. >> i'm jesse lewis' dad. >> reporter: the father of 6-year-old jesse lewis, a first grader, gunned down at sandy hook elementary with 19 classmates and 6 adults. >> jesse was the love of my life. he was the only family i have left. it's hard for me to be here today. to talk about my deceased son. but i have to. i'm his voice. >> reporter: neil heslin today called for a ban on assault weapons. emotions ran high all day. >> it's time for congress to pick a side. this time i hope it's law enforcement's. >> reporter: the milwaukee police chief got into it with republican senator lindsey graham, who today said he owns a so-called assault weapon over the need for background checks on people who want to buy a gun. >> how many cases -- >> you know, it doesn't matter. it's a paper thing. i want to stop 76 -- i want to finish the answer. >> no. >> i want to stop 76,000 people from buying guns illegally. that's what a background check does. if you think we're going
. we want to begin tonight with nbc's tom costello in glen echo, maryland. tom, good evening. >> reporter: hi, brian, no secret the postal service is up to its neck in red ink, handling 30 billion fewer pieces of first class mail today than just four years ago. and guess what? delivery of packages booming because we're all buying stuff online. this action is about just trying to keep the lights on. for people all over america, like 71-year-old lois sexton in tennessee, that mailbox at the end of the driveway has been a reliable connection to the rest of the world. >> that's my communication with the people i have my retirement with, my social security. >> reporter: since 1863, six days a week, rain or shine, letters, bills, government checks, newspapers, even movies, have arrived, even on saturday. now the 21st century with its e-mail, e-cards and e-pay, has come knocking. >> we cannot put our head in the sand and say, geez, let's hope this problem goes away. hope is not a strategy. >> reporter: calling the financial situation urgent, the postmaster general today announced th
begin tonight. tom costello is in bethesda, maryland. tom, good evening. >> reporter: hi, brian. good evening to you. $3.99 at this gas station right here. the timing is not good for this. the economy is fragile, and all the money that is going into gas tanks, it would and could be going into instead groceries, maybe a movie out, maybe a dinner out. at gas stations across the country, customers are asking the same question. what could possibly send gas prices up 43 cents in a month? that's an extra $8.60 on a 20-gallon car. in chicago, more than that, up 70 cents in a month to 4.$4.22 gallon. for taxi driver ray hubert, that's real money. >> it digs into my pocket. i pay for my own gas, nobody else pays for it. >> reporter: in los angeles, up 50 cents in a month to $4.28, some stations charging more than $5 a gallon. >> it doesn't make sense. we went to vegas last weekend and the prices were like $1.50 less. >> reporter: were portland to portland, gas prices have risen every day for the last month. >> the rising gasoline prices is extraordinary for this time of year. we usually see th
big jobs report? our report from nbc's tom costello. >> reporter: 25-year-old kory wilson can tell you, it's not easy looking for a job. she has applied for 200 since earning a master's degree in public relations last may. >> being a post graduate, either i'm overqualified or i'm underqualified. >> she is looking for work, but the economy seemingly poised to either take off or take a stumble. today new applications brought employment benefits jumped by 38,000. but they hit five-year lows the previous two weeks. personal income and spending both grew in december. the housing market seems to be improving, and while the economy actually shrank in the fourth quarter, many blame government spending cuts and the fiscal cliff stalemate. >> we have removed the financial panic and now we're waiting to kind of take a look at the dust and see how it's settled and see how much destruction there's really been. >> reporter: through it all, wall street has been on a tear. up nearly 6% this month. meanwhile, on main street -- >> i'm filling up once a week so $50 a week, $200 a month. >> gas prices are
report tonight from nbc's tom costello. >> reporter: we've all heard about pain at the pump, but the pain is suddenly starting to bite. >> these higher gas prices definitely affect the way i budget my money. where i choose to live. and how i choose to spend my leisurely time. >> more conscious about the distance i'm driving, or carpooling a lot more also. >> reporter: why the sudden jump? drivers in the midwest have paid the price for an explosion and fire that partially shut down a refinery near toledo. but it's more than that. cnbc's sharon epperson says the spring rally in gas prices has come early this year. >> we have refineries down in a number of locations. oil prices are rising. and then we have a supply shortage in california, and so inventories are being diverted from elsewhere in the country to help out with that. >> reporter: and the price hikes really hit home. the average american household spent $2,900 on gas in 2012, just under 4% of their income before taxes. with the exception of 2008, that was the highest in nearly 30 years. so could we pay even more in 2013? gas prices
big cosmic coincidence. nbc's tom costello reports. >> reporter: the video from russia is incredible. a massive meteor traveling at 33,000 miles per hour, trailing a brilliant quite contrail, hitting the atmosphere and exploding with the force of an atomic bomb. [ explosion ] >> reporter: the shock wave over the city of chebarkul damaged thousands of buildings, knocked down a factory wall and blew out windows across the city in freezing temperatures just as kids were starting the school day. >> translator: the ceiling was okay. but all the windows were broken. almost all the window panes were damaged. there are no windows without damage. >> reporter: the shards of glass injuring more than 1,000 people, 100 hospitalized. >> i heard this extremely loud noise that shook my apartment. >> reporter: canadian hockey player, michael garnett, lives there. we talked to him via skype. >> it blew the vents out of my bathroom and there was debris on the floor. and i am up on the 23rd floor and i could feel the building swaying. >> reporter: pieces of the meteor punched a hole in a frozen lake, bu
or the free trip. tom costello, nbc news, washington. >>> there is news tonight from the world of science. and this could be a day that lasts in medical history. the fda has approved the first-ever artificial, in effect, bionic eye. a pros thesis fitted on a pair of glasses that can bring some sight to those with a specific form of vision loss. we get the story tonight from our chief science correspondent, robert bazell. >> reporter: it is a dream come true. restoring at least some sight to the blind. the artificial retina is a tiny camera mounted on glasses that sends electrical signals directly to the brain cells that perceive light. the fda approved it today to treat a condition called retinitis big men toesa, an inherited disease that strikes 100,000 americans a year, and can lead to total blindness. the artificial retina does not achieve perfect sight, but it does allow blind people to see enough images so they can navigate a room safely and perform other tasks. >> that would be white. >> reporter: kathleen blake had been totally blind. and was one of the original test subjects. >> i
happened if either one had hit a city. tom costello, nbc news, washington. >> neil de grass tyson is an astro physicist and director of the haden planetarium. you're a man in demand today. >> thanks for having me on. yeah, apparently. >> we all have a lot of questions about this. what we saw in russia, first off. >> extraordinary. >> this is a big planet, mostly water. is this something that happens more often than we know? >> these blasts of that magnitude, there was one in the '90s that was an air blast above india and pakistan, right when they were negotiating nuclear control. and so that's a little worrisome, because one of them might have accused the other of a first strike. if you fill in the blanks with places these might have fallen where no one would have taken notice, like the middle of the pacific or over antarctica or the north pole or northern canada, i'm imaging you would get impacts of that magnitude anywhere between one, every five to ten years. >> and we should note, a lot of people have dashboard cameras. let me ask you about this astroid that had the near miss t
are highly suspicious as to what's causing this increase right now. it's where we begin tonight. tom costello is in bethesda, maryland. tom, good evening. >> reporter: hi, brian. good evening to you. $3.99 at this gas station right here.
to put gas in your car to come to work. >> reporter: 43 cents in a month. >> that was nbc's tom costello. >>> after a weekend, the president and staffers will be back at work this morning, but with only ten days to prevent the automatic spending cuts, one group will be absent. >> reporter: good morning, congress is away all week on recess, now strategists say they will make calls and try to come up with alternative savings. but voters here at the capitol say that is not good enough. president obama is back at the white house after a weekend golfing in florida. but congress is still away on recess, taking a break announced monday. voters in the capitol are upset that they actually went home. >> i would be hard at work. >> reporter: congress has just a week left to avoid the self-imposed spending cuts. >> they're not paying attention, it is less than a week away. >> in the past, they brought things down to the wire and figured things up. >> reporter: lawmakers are not entirely on vacation. they're back in their districts talking about the impact of the sequester. in boston, funding for hea
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feet wide. tom costello joins me from the newsroom. tom, what do we know so far about what happened in russia? >> it was absolutely unbelievable. it was spectacular. what's kind of interesting here is so many people in russia these days have these little go pro cameras because they want to capture when they're hit in a traffic accident or official corruption. we have many views of this asteroid traveling at 33,000 miles per hour slamming into the earth's atmosphere above southwestern russia. this happened at 9:15 this morning. this town has a million people in it. thankfully most of the debris actually fell outside of the town, but it blew out the windows in nearly every single building and in many, many homes, and keep in mind, these are soviet era designs, so they're not terribly well built. a short time ago i talked to a canadian who was living there in that particular part of russia because he is a professional hockey player. michael says the shock wave from that meteor shook his apartment building, and he says the lights began to sway. >> it blew the vents out of my bathroom, a
people argue they're often inaccurate or unfair. tom costello has been looking into that story. tom, good morning to you. >> reporter: savannah, good morning. 24 states and d.c. allow these red light cameras. nine states ban them. fairness is the big issue. in court, depending where you are, you might be able to ask a police officer about the ticket he wrote you, but you can't do that with a camera and the camera presumes that you're guilty, not innocent. they can be horrific crashes, red light runners are especially dangerous because the people they hit are usually caught completely by surprise. each year, some 700 people die and 122,000 are injured in accidents involving a driver who ran the red. to cut into that rate, more than 540 communities nationwide have turned to red light cameras. in washington, d.c., the police chief is a firm believer. >> even just in the last five years, 54 traffic fatalities down to 19. that's dramatic. >> reporter: nationwide, insurance institute for highway safety says cameras have cut crashes by 24% and fatalities at intersections by 17%. >> when traffic
to make up for the $15.9 billion that it lost in the last fiscal year. tom costello in our washington bureau are more on this. this is something people have been talking about for a long time. we've already gotten the fact on the other end of things that stamp prices have gone up, but they were looking at ways to make a major dent. does this do it? >> no, it doesn't do it. it doesn't meet the entire deficit, if you will. they're losing $16 billion a year, and this is important. you've got to understand why they're losing it. the biggest reason they're losing so much money is because they, unlike any other government entity, they are forced to pay in advance for the retirement medical benefits of their retirees even before they retire. so as a result, that huge chunk of cash that they have to set aside is costing them a fortune and it is a huge drag on the postal service. second to that, yes, all of us are using e-mail and paying our bills online. and therefore first class mail has dropped off a cliff. however, package delivery has increased dramatically because you and i are shopping
$4 and approaching $5 in the coming weeks, brian. >> a lot of money. tom costello starting us off in bethesda, maryland. thanks. >>> olympic track star oscar pistorius is due back in court tomorrow after spending nearly a week now in a jail in south africa, accused of murdering his girlfriend on valentine's day. tonight we're getting new details on what police may have found inside the pistorius' home. nbc's michelle kosinski with us from pretoria, south africa. good evening. >> reporter: hi, brian. oscar pistorius only months ago made olympic history. this career had him set to race on four continents in the next few months. now his agent has cancelled everything. nike says it will no longer use him in ads. he is here in jail, preparing to face prosecutors in court tomorrow. oscar pistorius, brought to jail on valentine's day, the day his girlfriend was shot to death seen in these exclusive pictures, covering his face with his jacket. since then, visits from his family, agent, friends and lawyers. tomorrow he will be back in court for a bond hearing the same day as reeva steenkam
. nbc news, london. >>> well, nbc news correspondent tom costello joins us with more on all that activity in the skies. you talked to somebody in russia who experienced this thing today? >> i did. believe it or not there's a canadian hockey player in this part of russia. i asked him, what are you doing there? he's playing for this league and apparently doing pretty well. he was in bed this morning when suddenly everything started to shake in his apartment. >> there was swinging, it blew the vents out of my bathroom, and there was debris on the floor. i'm up on the 23rd floor. i could feel the buildings swaying. i didn't see the meet i don't go by, but i saw this giant streak that had come across and i was terrified at that point. i didn't know what it was. >> i just got back from the smithsonian. i was talking to some of the meteorite experts, believe it or not they have those, and they meteors are extremely heavy. i got to hold a piece of one, mostly iron, 90% iron. they survive, those pieces that survive reentry are charred, of course, but a meteor is a piece of an asteroi
costello has been looking into that story. tom, good morning to you. >> reporter: savannah, good morning. 24 states and d.c. allow these red light cameras. nine states ban them. fairness is the big issue. in court, depending where you are, you might be able to ask a police officer about the ticket he wrote you, but you can't do that with a camera and the camera presumes that you're guilty, not innocent. they can be horrific crashes, red light runners are especially dangerous because the people they hit are usually caught completely by surprise. each year, some 700 people die and 122,000 are injured in accidents involving a driver who ran the red. to cut into that rate, more than 540 communities nationwide have turned to red light cameras. in washington, d.c., the police chief is a firm believer. >> even just in the last five years, 54 traffic fatalities down to 19. that's dramatic. >> reporter: nationwide, insurance institute for highway safety says cameras have cut crashes by 24% and fatalities at intersections by 17%. >> when traffic violations are enforced, violations go down. >> repo
.53 for unleaded regular. also a 17-cent hike in just a week. tom costello takes a look at the reasons why. tom, good morning. >> reporter: good morning, matt. yes, we hear you in california and new york and illinois and vermont. we know you're paying a lot more there, of course. you can blame a lot of things here. for the beginning, refinery shutdowns, a shift over to summer blends and a perception on wall street that the economy is picking up. it is all the talk from coast to coast, those pump prices. >> i don't even want to like know the amount at the end of the week because i don't want to get depressed. >> i'm going to drive a lot less for now, i know that for sure. >> you're wasting like 60 bucks a week. >> reporter: several refineries are down for maintenance, a supply shortage in california, oil prices are rising. then there are economic factors. >> there's often a run-up in gas prices in february and march as the refineries transition from making the winter grade to the summer grade of gasoline. summer blend is often more expensive and more costly to make and that means more cost at th
costello is in richburg, south carolina this morning, getting ready for hail season. tom, good morning. >> reporter: good morning, david. we are 60 feet off in the catwalk. below me is a house, test house that they are going to pound with hail. 10,000 pieces of hail, some of it two inches in diameter, coming from air canons, 72 of them. in a minute, tanya brown will give the order. tanya, go ahead. >> all right, ian, three, two, one. fire! >> reporter: this is the biggest test ever of what hail can do to a house. we've seen them blast homes with hurricane force winds. we've seen them re-create wildfires with flying embers. now at this massive test chamber in south carolina, it's hail. two-inch balls of ice, loaded and fired from high-powered air canons. within seconds, they're gouging the siding and punching holes in the roof, to replicate actual hail, that can contain bubbles of oxygen, they use regular water and seltzer water. the rest is a determination of size, mass, terminal velocity, speed and air drag. insurance industry says hail causes $1 billion worth of property and crop dam
-pilot was then forced to make an emergency landing in portland, oregon. tom costello covers aviation for us. good morning to you. >> good morning, savannah. this is why commercial airplanes always have two pilots in the cockpit. alaska airlines flight 473 flying from l.a. to seattle that left l.a. about 6:40 pm. it was mid flight when the pilot suddenly became unconscious. the plane was on autopilot at the time. the first officer took over the controls and declared an emergency and put the plane down in portland, oregon. a doctor on board helped to treat the pilot and paramedics in portland then met the plane on the ramp and assisted with treatment before taking him to a nearby hospital. we don't have any word on his condition. we're told he is a 28-year veteran pilot. the first officer is an 11-year veteran pilot. some of the passengers were rebooked on a shuttle flight to seattle while others had to wait for a replacement pt pilot till midnight. we have cell phone video of a flight in denver, scheduled to come into san diego -- rather from san diego to new york city was diverted due to an unrul
firearms so they will only work for the owner. tom costello has been looking into that question. good morning. >> matt, the short answer is, yes, it is possible. this idea was floated 20 years ago to address the number of police officers by someone who grabbed their weapon. since then, the technology has come a long way. what if the gun that adam stole from his mother to kill 20 children and 6 adults in newtown, connecticut, what if that gun refused to work? a smart gun only fired by its authorized owner, the kind of technology we see in the latest james bond movie, ""skyfall"." >> the grip has been coded to your palm prints so only you can fire it. less of a random killing machine, more of a personal statement. >> turns out it's not just in the movies. >> if you take it from me, within seconds, the light turns red. give it back to me, i take it from you, it's green again. >> reporter: the technology already exists both in handguns and rifles. with the i-gun rifle, it's all about the micro-chip inside the ring the gun owner wears. the chip transmits a code in the receiver to the rifle
's tom costello has the story. >> reporter: they can be horrific crashes. red light runners dangerous because they people they hit are usually caught completely by surprise. each year 700 people die and 122,000 are involved in a driver who ran the red. to cut into that rate, 540 communities nationwide have turned to red light cameras. in washington, d.c., the police chief is a firm believer. >> even in the last five year, we've cut 54 traffic fatalities to 19. that's dramatic. >> reporter: the insurance newt for highway said said fate fatales are cut by 17%. so why then is this lawmaker in new jersey determined to tear them all out? >> because they're a rip-off. because they are designed to steal money from innocent people. >> reporter: assemblyman declano said they're designed for cash. catching people who just stepped over the white line. who doesn't quite clear the intersection before the red. who turned right on a red, who were waved through by a construction crew or were forced into the interaction by a passing emergency vehicle. >> probably 80% to 90% of people who get tickets a
accurate than the american version in projecting the path of storms. we asked nbc's tom costello in washington to find out why. good morning, tom. >> reporter: hi, natalie. good morning to you. it all comes down to computing power. europeans and americans are using the same science, same mathematical equations, but the europeans are constantly monitoring the atmospheric conditions while the american model is taking periodic snapshots. it was hurricane sandy that really pointed out the difference between the european and american models. al roker saw a full week before the storm hit the european model was predicting a devastating blow to new york and new jersey. >> the european model keeps it hugging the coast and by early tuesday morning, it's inland in the northeast. >> reporter: four days before landfall, the u.s. model finally agreed with the european model. now, a crippling blizzard predicted for new england. >> easily boston, a foot will be on the low end of your accumulation. >> reporter: and, again, the european model was three days ahead of the u.s. in predicting this sto
the fall of 2007. tom costello explains why. >>> a big rally on wall street friday with the dow back over 14,000. a lot has changed since the last time it crossed that mark, on october 12, 2007. within a year, lehmann brothers and bear stearns had failed. housing prices went off a cliff. and the unemployment rate went from 4.7% to 10% before falling back to 1now. >> 80% of the people we saw had been out of work for three months up to two years. >> reporter: julie onberg has been out of work for 16 months. >> my last job was front desk at a pain management company, and just -- i actually got sick. and couldn't be there any longer. >> reporter: nationwide, 12 million americans are still out of work. >> 7.9% unemployment, simply not good enough. wages don't rise, older folks don't see enough stock market gains to retire, not enough jobs for young people leaving school. >> reporter: the jobs picture slowly improving, a different story on wall street. after bottoming out four years ago, the dow has since climbed 111%. cnn has seen a mood shift on wall street. the economy is slowly improving, n
of 2007. tom costello explains why. [ bell ] >> reporter: a big rally on wall street friday with the dow back over 14,000. a lot has changed since the last time it crossed that mark on october 12, 2007. within a year, lehman brothers and bear stearns had fired, housing prices went off a cliff, the unemployment rate went from 4.7% to 10% before falling back to 7.9% now. in portland, oregon, this week, more than 900 people applied for 160 new jobs at two hardware stores. >> 80% of the people we saw had been out of work from three months up to two years. >> reporter: julie ober has been out of work for 16 months. >> my last job was front desk at a pain management company. and just -- i actually got sick and couldn't be there any longer. >> reporter: nationwide, some 12 million americans are still out of work. >> 7.9% unemployment, simply not good enough. with that, wages don't rise. older folks don't see enough stock market gains to retire. there's not enough new jobs for young people leaving school. >> reporter: while the jobs picture has been slowly improving, it's been a different story
. tom costello is following this breaking story as well. good morning. >> natalie, good morning. this is the carnival cruise ship triumph. a four-day cruise that left galveston, texas, friday. it is now drifting after a fire in the engine room. 150 miles off the mexican yucatan coast. the fire was put out by a sprinkler system on board and the crew. it has left the ship withoutny propulsion. it is drifting, operating on emergency power and a tugboat is en route. it should arrive some time this morning. there are about 3,100 passengers and a crew of more than 1,000. they are being given food and refreshments, another carnival cruise ship pulled alongside to help and the coast guard cutter vigorous was also dispatched as well. the plan is to tow the ship to a port in mexico, where passengers will deboard and then be flown to houston. the next two departures set for today and saturday have been canceled. carnival says the passengers who booked on those next two trips will be given full refunds and discounts toward future cruises. the passengers on board this ship will be given full
the world's largest airline as american airlines and us airways join forces. nbc tom costello covers aviation for us. good morning. >> this is an $11 billion and it helps american emerge from chapter 11. as you said the world's biggest airline, 94,000 employees, 6,700 daily flights. what does it mean for travelers? previous mergers have often led to higher ticket prices. watch for that. these two carriers expected to operate separately at least a year, maybe longer. existing tickets, of course, will be honored. frequent flier programs for now will remain separate and it will require justice department approval, it will take time. >> thank you. >>> the president has declared a state of disaster in south mississippi after a powerful tornado ripped through hattiesburg earlier this week. officials estimate that it could take tens of millions of dollars to repair the destruction left in the twister's path. it severely damaged parts of a college campus and hundreds of homes. >>> some positive news on the economy this morning. fewer americans are on the road to foreclosure. the number of ho
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 64 (some duplicates have been removed)